The Rise of Plastic Surgery during a Pandemic.

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Yup, you read that right.  Despite a pandemic, high unemployment rates, and a possible pending recession, the demand for plastic surgery is through the roof.  While this blog will be primarily anecdotal and my opinion only, I think this is quite interesting. In fact, I can only say that I, too, am quite surprised by what we are seeing. Here are some of the main reasons why I think this is happening. 

People are working from home.  One of the huge deterrents or hurdles we often face when planning surgery is getting time off of work to recover. Depending on the surgery and your job, this may range from a few days to several weeks.  Of course, it’s always hard to hit pause on your life.  With COVID, many people are stuck at home anyway so they can continue to work on the computer and heal without anyone knowing.

You’ve had several weeks of quarantine to do all the googling your heart desires.  Generally, we find that patients take about 1 year between that initial thought of having a procedure to actually getting it done. During this time, they may talk to friends, hop online, check out Instagram accounts, or even set up a few consultations.  During quarantine, we all of a sudden have a lot more time in front of the screens to do our research. So, what may have taken months to do, now takes weeks and people are ready to move forward.

You may have some expendable cash.  With the world shut down, other than online shopping, people are not spending as much. We are not out and about spending money on shopping, target runs, travel, grabbing drinks with friends or eating out. This is money that can get then be put towards a procedure or treatment. 

That “Zoom” effect. This is definitely a thing.  With a rise in Zoom, FaceTime, and other video conferencing apps, we are literally just staring at our faces in unusually awful lighting and angles.  All of a sudden, our wrinkles, skin, and necks begin to bother us.  Fast forward to when restrictions are lifted and the demand to get injectables like Botox & Kybe lla  have increased. 

The Covid19.  I mean the 19 lbs we all gained during COVID not the virus itself.  It’s hard to stay motivated to eat healthy and work out when gyms are closed and, well, coronavirus. We’ve seen an uptick in liposuction and tummy tucks.  While surgery is never a treatment for weight loss, this is always a good option for trouble areas that don’t get better no matter what you do. 

Now you may be wondering what the biggest trend is? Breast augmentations, by far in my practice have gone up.  While this has always been the most popular plastic surgery procedure, there had been more and more patients in the past year coming in to have implants removed or to have a natural boost with fat transfer.  Why do I think this is the case?  Glad you asked. Breast augmentations are an easy, quick (when you are in the right hands!), instant gratification type of procedure. They don’t break the bank and you can return to work quickly.  So, for patients that may or may not know exactly when their offices may be opening back up again, they can still get this procedure done beforehand. 

You deserve it.  Let’s be honest, quarantine during coronavirus was miserable.  Everything that was our normal was taken away from us in a matter of days.  We’ve home schooled, worked from home, we were locked inside 4 walls, we couldn’t work out, we couldn’t even really buy groceries without worrying about exposure.  After all of the stress, fear, craziness of quarantine, we deserve to treat ourselves. End of story. 

What do you all think? I cannot comment on whether this is across the board in plastic surgery and other fields or just what I am personally experiencing. I can tell you, however, that I'm grateful to be back at work taking care of patients and interested to see how this will all play out in the future. In the meantime, stay safe, socially distance, and wear your mask. Hope to see you all on the other side of this soon!

* All information subject to change. Images may contain models. Individual results are not guaranteed and may vary.